Sony pro video cameras reduce shake, project pics, capture slo-mo

Sony claims it is providing video professionals “freedom from camera shake” with its new HXR-NX30U, its smallest, lightest handheld professional high-definition camcorder.

The $2,500 “palm-size addition” to the company’s NXCAM line offers “breakthrough Balanced Optical SteadyShot image stabilization technology,” the company says, “to significantly reduce camera shake in challenging shooting applications.” Conventional image stabilization systems typically “float” an individual lens element with a motor drive to compensate for camera shake, Sony says, but its Balanced Optical SteadyShot “combines the entire lens and image sensor assembly into one floating element that moves as a unit to reduce the shaking effect caused by normal motion during shooting.”

The HXR-NX30U records 1080/60p HD video with a 1/2.88-inch Exmor R CMOS image sensor. It has a Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T lens with a 10x optical zoom/26mm-260mm (35mm equivalent).

The new camcorder also has a built-in projector that Sony says lets users play back images of up to 100 inches from a distance of about 16 feet on any flat surface. “This feature is ideal for reviewing footage in the field or on a set, when a monitor is either not available or convenient to use.”

 

Also: the new NEX-FS700 is billed as a “Super Slow Motion camcorder” and offers interchangeable lens capability.

Designed for high-speed shooting, it captures up to 960 frames per second at reduced resolutions, “ideal for pop promos, commercials and documentaries as well as sports and a variety of events productions,” Sony says. Full-HD images are limited to 120 and 240 frames per second.

The NEX-FS700 camcorder uses a new 4K Exmor Super 35 CMOS sensor with an 11.6 megapixel resolution. “This high-speed readout chip is optimized for motion picture shooting,” Sony says, “giving high sensitivity, low noise and minimal aliasing.” However, the better-than-HD 4k video promised by such a sensor will only be available through a later firmware update, Sony says.

The camcorder will sell for less than $10,000 with an 18-200mm lens.

 

About Paul Worthington

Paul Worthington is a journalist and consumer imaging consultant. He produces the annual Future Imaging Summit at PMA@CES, and writes for PMA Newsline and PMA Magazine, as well as other publications.