OWC: Win a pocket drive, and help a charity

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To mark its 25th year, Other World Computing will award 25 randomly chosen contest  participants a pocket-sized one-terabyte hard drive — and also donate to a charity that brings clean water to those who need it.

OWC says its 25th year sweepstakes and charity project will “help make a difference in the world.” For every person that signs up for the Sweepstakes, OWC will donate $1 to a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing clean and safe drinking water to people in developing nations. On average, every $20 raised brings clean, safe drinking water to one person. “This is not just a great cause,” the company says, “but a true solution for one of the most basic needs of all: the availability of clean water.”

More information is here.

 

A little boost in your day from Michael Stahl

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Those of you who attended PMA 2006 might remember a great session with speaker Michael Stahl on focusing your power. Michael recently got back in touch with us, and offered to share some of his business tips and motivational articles. Here’s a recent installment in his Michael L. Stahl’s Motivational Moment series. Keep an eye out for more from Michael, coming soon in PMA Newsline.

Eric Moussambani…

Does the name ring a bell? Well you have probably never heard of this young man before but he is a true Olympic Champion. What medal did he win? Oh Eric did not win any medal – no gold, silver or bronze for him.

This Olympian is from the tiny country of Equatorial Guinea in Africa. He competed in the 2000 Sydney, Australia Summer Olympics. He was a competitor in the 100-meter freestyle swimming event. You’ll never find him in the record books either. The only way Eric could even get to the Olympics is through  a special program designed by the International Olympic Committee. It allowed 121 developing countries to send their best athletes to Sydney. As a result, 485 men and women from impoverished countries around the globe got to compete in the Olympics.

Eric was one of those Olympians who got to fulfill a dream to just BE THERE.  He was the flag bearer for his country in the opening ceremonies and was terrified – never having been in front of more than 100,000 people in such a massive stadium.

He competed in the last preliminary heat of the men’s 100-meter freestyle swimming event. There were two other athletes racing against him in his heat but they both were disqualified for false starts. So, there he was, Eric Moussambani – one guy racing against himself in an enormous Olympic size pool.

Setting a personal best was not difficult, due to the fact that he had never even seen an Olympic size pool. His country is too poor to have an Olympic size pool in which to train.
In fact, he had only begun swimming nine months before the Olympics. Where did he swim? Well he got his time in a tiny size hotel pool – when guests were not in it of course. Eric, never having had a coach, did not know the proper technique of keeping his head down to increase his speed. He just knew how to swim the best he could in that small hotel pool.

So there he was, swimming his heart out in his outdated bathing suit. Eric could only dream of being able to afford one of the high dollar “fast suits” world class swimmers wore at the time. He made it across the pool. Yet, as he made the turn to come back, he started to feel extreme fatigue. Eric Moussambani was putting his honor on the line in front of the whole world.

The crowd of 17,000 noticed this one man struggling and gasping for air as he painfully tried to finish the race. They erupted to their feet and the entire aquatic center exploded in cheers of encouragement for Eric. You would have thought this was the final medal race as 17,000 people screamed, cheered and rained thunderous applause down on this brave young man.

Exhausted, Eric could barely move his arms and legs when he heard the earth moving cheers and applause of the crowd. He dug down even deeper into his heart and finished the race as the audience wildly applauded his effort. He finished with a time of 1 minute and 52 seconds. The average time for this race was 48 seconds. Yet, for the first time he had ever swam 100-meters in his life, Eric felt like a winner – and he was. He said later that the crowd helped him finish the race with their encouragement. He said they were screaming so loud he thought he had won a medal.

Eric waved to the wildly cheering fans as he stepped out of the pool – knowing that he had given his best and more. He said it was an honor just to be at the Olympics and appreciated all the warmth he had received.

Eric Moussambani is a champion of the highest caliber.

When you want to give up, think about his painful 100-meter swim. Think about the courage he showed in even starting the race, having never done that distance before. Life is about giving the best you have to achieve your personal goals.

You may not be a world-class athlete or a multi-millionaire or a famous celebrity. None of that matters though if you have the courage to give the best you have and keep going when it would be easier to just quit.

 

Michael L. Stahl if the Founding Partner and President of Motivational Concepts. He is an alumnus of Oklahoma State University and has traveled to 22 countries around the globe. As a speaker and consultant, Michael has worked with some of the world’s largest and most prestigious companies including AAA, DuPont, The Beverly Hilton, The Four Seasons, Oracle, Sprint, United Healthcare, Tishman Construction, Turner Construction and Tupperware. He is the author of two manuals on business and personal growth and has appeared on CNN Financial News discussing successful business strategies. He can be reached from www.michaelstahl.com or by calling 407-375-8271.

Joellyn Gray of Fujifilm talks about changing demographics and the opportunities they present on the DIMAcast

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Hi folks, it’s Jen Kruger, PMA Director of Communications. When I was at 6Sight in June, I heard Joellyn Gray of Fujifilm talking about changing demographics in the U.S., what different age groups have in common and how retailers and others in the imaging industry can effectively market to them. She offered so many great insights that I wanted to share with you, so I invited her to do an interview on the DIMAcast. You can listen to that interview now by clicking here, or by using the player below. And be sure to keep an eye out for the next issue of PMA magazine, coming out early in January, right before PMA@CES, for an article based on this interview.

Got a great idea for a DIMAcast interview? Feedback on PMA Newsline or a story suggestion for PMA magazine? Email me! I’d love to hear from you.

Colorized provides social sketchpad

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Happiness Engines says its Colorized iPhone app combines the power of the camera, and “the creative genius of the touchscreen’s drawing capabilities” to spur a sketch-centered conversation, allowing people to draw on photos, and remix and share their creations.

The iPhone’s camera has forever changed the way people view and capture the world around them, the company says, and “we’ve all been doodling since we were kids.” Colorized is a modern, social way to doodle, and “lets you turn the world around you into a canvas or a coloring book — and more importantly, prompts a great visual conversation with your friends.”

The app has filters and effects to transform photos, as well as  drawing tools and stamps.

More information is here.