Half of photo apps abandoned

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Is that glass half full or empty?, asks Suite 48 Analytics with a new survey that finds mobile photographers abandon about half of their downloaded photo apps — but still use the other half regularly.

(Personally, I’ve downloaded dozens and dozens of apps I’ve not even tried yet, let alone abandoned — and a good chunk of those were paid, not free apps… albeit $1–2.)

Suite 48 Analytics polled 216 North American and European smartphone users, asking respondents what percentage of the photo apps that they have downloaded in the previous 12 months they still use more than once a month. The average percentage still used is 51 percent, and the median 50 percent.  The Flash Survey is the first of a series of free targeted and fast survey projects the company plans “to further enhance customer and market insights for photo app developers and imaging vendors.”

A free white paper, “Ongoing Photo App Use,” is here. It reports on how many photo apps mobile photographers have installed on their smartphones.

Suite 48 Analytics principal Hans Hartman will be speaking at the PMA conference on January 10.

 

 

Serif speeds up PhotoPlus editor

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English developer Serif says its updated photo editing software “allows photographers at any level to quickly and easily create outstanding images, at an affordable price.”

PhotoPlus X6 is compatible with Windows 8. New features include a smart edge refinement tool which selects and adjusts intricate parts of photos such as hairs and leaves; non-destructive crop; tilt shift effects with Depth-of-Field filter; vector masks; and improvements to noise reduction, zoom range and guides.  Also, with its new 64-bit engine, PhotoPlus X6 edits very large images without slowing down.

The $90 program “offers a great balance between quick fixes and advanced editing,” the company says.

More information is here.

 

 

 

Alternative output with Print My Watercolor

Jesse Goff, print my watercolor

Photographer Jesse Goff branched out from looking for large-format printers to doing the work himself — and then launching a series of online output services. The latest business offers a great way to preserve pictures: Print My Watercolor is a San Francisco boutique print shop that outputs on high quality watercolor paper, hand-cut and hand-assembled in a wood hanger.

Our interview with Jesse can be downloaded here on the AIE Imaging Executive podcast, along with a highlights from this week’s photography news. Better yet: subscribe on iTunes here!

You can also stream it live right here: