Apple acquires multi-image sensor developer LinX

linx module

linx module

SLR image quality in a phone?…
Last year we reported on the LinX’ technology that captured high-resolution images using an array of lower-res sensors. On Wednesday, The Wall Street Journal reportedApple acquired the developer for approx. $20 million.

The Israeli company last year claimed it could match SLR image quality with lower-cost components thanks to its arrays and algorithms.

In 2013, Apple acquired PrimeSense, the developer of a 3D-sensing imager.

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From our previous coverage:

Mobile module combines cameras
“The image quality of mobile cameras has reached a dead end,” claims LinX Computational Imaging. So, of course, they say they have a new route, by developing miniature multi-aperture camera modules.
The mobile modules “are nearly half the height of a standard mobile camera and are capable of creating stunning color images,” the company says… Its ““multi-aperture imaging technologies” combine multiple images “captured from different points in space.” It also has overcome problems such as registration errors and occlusion-related artifacts arising from combining multiple images. The technique also captures accurate depth information, and creates a depth map that can be uses for 3D reconstruction.
There’s more information here.

PMA President Gabrielle Mullinax honored with Small Business of the Year Award

MullinaxGaby_2013

MullinaxGaby_2013PMA President Gaby Mullinax, owner of Fullerton Photographics in Fullerton, Calif., is having a good year. In January, she was honored with the PMDA Visionary of the Year award, and, of course, the following day, she was elected president of PMA – becoming the first female president in our 90-year history. Now, she is being honored again, this time with the Small Business of the Year award, presented by the Fullerton Chamber of Commerce.

The Small Business of the Year award recognizes businesses for extraordinary achievement in a number of key areas, such as involvement in the community, service above self, outreach, ethical business practices, length of service, innovation, leadership, environmental awareness, and ability to promote wellness and learning for employees.

“Those of us in the imaging industry are very familiar with Gaby’s remarkable vision, her business acumen, her creative genius, and her generous spirit, so it’s certainly no surprise to see her being recognized once again for her achievements. That she is now being honored by her local community with the Small Business of the Year award is just another reason for us to be proud and confident to have her leading PMA as president in this critical year of reinvention,” said PMA CEO Georgia McCabe.

The Small Business of the Year award will be presented to Fullerton Photographics at the Chamber’s Business Achievement Awards Dinner on June 17.

Photo organizers unite

APPO

appo

The Association of Personal Photo Organizers is now officially affiliated with The National Association of Professional Organizers, as NAPO focuses on “building collaborative relationships with organizations whose missions are in alignment with NAPO’s focus on promoting professional organizer and the organizing industry.”

At the NAPO2015 conference in Los Angeles this year, APPO will lead a session on best practices in the growing niche of digital photo organizing.

APPO says it now has more than 500 members throughout the United States, Canada, Australia and United Kingdom. They offer monthly training and certification.

IEEE updating image quality ratings

ieee_logo_mb_tagline

ieee_logo_mb_taglineIEEE says its industry-wide effort will “develop and deliver a standardized, metrics-based rating system for mobile device image quality” — and they’re asking others to join in the effort.

“Stakeholders globally… (are) invited to participate,” says the professional organization dedicated to advancing technology. “The IEEE Camera Phone Image Quality conformity assessment steering committee is engaging carriers, mobile-device camera designers and manufacturers in creating a rating system that is easily understandable for consumers.”

The goal is “development of a standardized approach to testing and certifying smartphone cameras. This standardized approach will provide great value to players throughout the camera phone supply chain, as well as consumers,” IEE says. The standards association adds that “There is a need in the marketplace for a clear, concise and comprehensive definition of image quality that consumers of current and future mobile imaging devices worldwide could use in comparing products. We envision a rating system that would eliminate ambiguity about the image quality to expect from a given device, and help consumers make better-educated buying decisions for their specific needs. In these ways, these efforts bring clarity to the marketplace and ultimately fuel innovation of higher-quality devices and overall market growth.”

There’s more information here.

 

Tiffen wins Oscar award

Oscars2015_Tiffen

Oscars2015_Tiffen

It’s Oscar time for the Tiffen Company.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences recognized Steven Tiffen, Jeff Cohen and Michael Fecik for their efforts in developing dye-based filters that reduce infrared contamination when neutral density filters are used with digital cameras.

The Academy says Tiffen “identified the problem and rapidly engineered a series of absorptive filters that ameliorated infrared artifacts with lenses of all focal lengths,” and bestowed the Scientific and Technical Academy Award of Commendation. “These widely adopted filters allow cinematographers to work as they have done with film-based technology,” the Academy adds.

“We stand committed to continuing to support this industry that we love,” Steve Tiffen said, “and we find it so wonderfully pleasing that in this world of digital technology, Tiffen optical filters are recognized as a staple for professional imagemakers across the globe.”

There’s more information here.

oscars 86th

PMA friends pause for a picture at photokina

photokina shot

I just came across this shot of some very familiar faces, and I thought I’d share it with you. This was taken a few days ago at the AAA Imaging booth at photokina. Pictured left to right are Mike Wodushek, Neil Cohen, John Segall, Chris Noterman and Bob Noterman.

photokina shot

Texas court strikes down ‘improper photography’ statute

1280px-Flag_of_Texas.svg

1280px-Flag_of_Texas.svg

Yes, a kind of picture-taking was against the law in Texas…
“Improper photography” had been defined as arousing photography taken without consent. Yes, it was perhaps primarily first meant to simply stop peeping toms and such scofflaws. But vague wording meant enforcement could have overreached, and it could have been a dangerous precedent. Thankfully it’s been struck down.

Part of the Court’s reasoning:
“A statute is likely to be found overbroad if the criminal prohibition it creates is of “alarming breadth.” Such is the case with the current statute, the breadth of which has been accurately characterized as “breathtaking.” The statutory provision at issue is extremely broad, applying to any non-consensual photograph, occurring anywhere, as long as the actor has an intent to arouse or gratify sexual desire. This statute could easily be applied to an entertainment reporter who takes a photograph of an attractive celebrity on a public street. But the statute operates unconstitutionally even if applied to someone who takes purely public photographs of another for personal reasons with the requisite intent.”

The full story is here — written by the law professor who co-wrote the legal brief in the court case.

Canon’s Kwanon is 80

The_Kwanon_camera_prototype

The_Kwanon_camera_prototype

It’s been 80 years since Canon debuted its first camera, the Kwanon. (And to think it doesn’t look a day over 79!)

The Kwanon was the first 35mm focal-plane-shutter camera in Japan, Canon says, and was “the culmination of the dreams of engineers who wanted to catch up with Europe, the leading presence in the camera industry at the time.” It was named after the Buddhist goddess of mercy.

Two years later, Canon launched its Hansa commercial 35mm focal-plane-shutter camera. It wasn’t until 1959 that Canon introduced its first single-lens reflex camera.

 

Witness to Genius: photographer keynotes mobile conference

doug menuez

doug menuezOne photographer had access to the early days at many Silicon Valley innovators — and he’ll share what he saw and learned at the Mobile Photo Connect industry conference.

Photographer Doug Menuez is the author of “Fearless Genius: Witness to the Digital Revolution,” in which he is “reporting what I saw – I was in the room and witnessed the decisions and actions.” He was invited by Steve Jobs and other execs to “record their stories of struggle, failure, sacrifice and success, from 1985 to 2000.”

The special session will be “a source of insight and inspiration for today’s entrepreneurs,” says Mobile Photo Connect conference chair Hans Hartman. He also announced the first 23 of 30 developers who will present their photo apps in three fast-paced show-and-tell sessions. Among the companies demonstrating are Dropbox, Fujifilm, Kodak Alaris, Lifepics, Magisto, and MailPix.

mobile photo connect

Camera history shown on World Photography Day

Dageurreotype

world photo day

For World Photo Day, the project opened its “global gallery” for submissions, and other sites served a look at the history of digital photography.

Dageurreotype

Popular Photography notes the world was “introduced to Dageurreotype Photography 175 Years Ago” here. “On this day in 1839, the daguerreotype process was officially announced to the public and the materials required to make them became available to the public,” the site adds. “The Giroux daguerrotype camera started making its way across the world just a few weeks after it was announced. “The Giroux daguerrotype camera started making its way across the world just a few weeks after it was announced. It was a huge step in terms of the photographic process, adding a new layer and beginning a movement that would ultimately result in our current state where cameras are pretty much omnipresent.”

modernphotography

Imaging developer Lytro looks back at 175 years of photography here. “Starting with the first recorded photograph on paper in 1839 and finishing with the exciting future unfolding with light field photography, the infographic takes you through the twists and turns photography has taken over nearly two centuries to become the advanced technological marvel it is today,” the company says.

tech-philippe-kahn

And Digital Spy shows an overview of camera development here.