Teaching computers to understand photos

teach computer vision

teach computer vision

Today, even toddlers better comprehend a photograph… but tomorrow?

Computer scientists at Stanford are new ways to with which computers can identify what a photograph is showing.

This video of a TED talk describes the ImageNet project that has changed how computers “see,” Petapixel reports. “The project uses a database of 15 million photographs to teach computers to recognize things in pictures. After putting a monumental effort toward building and polishing the collection, Li’s team released the dataset to the world for free, and it has since become one of the industry benchmarks in how well computers can perform in recognition.”

The full article is here.

The video is here.

3-sensor iPhone camera?

Apple 3 lens patent 1

Apple 3 lens patent 1

While not every patent makes it into a shipped product, it’s worth noting when the leading camera company by some measures develops a significantly different design (at least, different within the mobile phone form factor) —

Apple’s latest USPTO imaging patent “details a miniaturized iPhone camera system that employs a light-splitting cube to parse incoming rays into three color components, each of which are captured by separate sensors,” Apple Insider reports.

The patent is here.

An interesting and informative discussion is here on the Apple Insider forums.

Google improves its facial recognition system

google face recognition

google face recognition

Google researchers claim their FaceNet artificial intelligence system represents the most-accurate approach yet to recognizing human faces, Fortune reports.

FaceNet achieved nearly 100-percent accuracy on a popular facial-recognition dataset called Labeled Faces in the Wild, which includes more than 13,000 pictures of faces from across the web. Trained on a 260-million-image dataset, FaceNet performed with better than 86 percent accuracy.

Google’s approach “can also put a name to a face—classic facial recognition—and even present collections of faces that look the most similar or the most distinct,” Fortune adds.

Fortune’s article is here.

Here is the researcher’s paper.

Windows securely says Hello via camera

windows hello

windows hello

Microsoft’s latest version of Windows will soon authenticate you on your personal computer by analyzing your face via cameras such as Intel’s RealSense 3D.

Windows Hello is “biometric authentication which can provide instant access to your Windows 10 devices,” the company says. “With Windows Hello, you’ll be able to just show your face… and be immediately recognized.” It will also read your iris or fingerprint “with technology that is much safer than traditional passwords. The cameras use infrared technology to identify your face or iris and can recognize you in a variety of lighting conditions.”

Also, the infrared, depth sensing, and facial recognition mean an imposter can’t log in by holding up your photo.

New 3D camera heading to mobile image capture

dual aperture

dual aperture

Palo Alto-based Dual Aperture partnered with SK Telecom, and says its depth and gesture tracking will “empower mobile camera-based applications to explore new dimensions of user experience.”

SKT is Korea’s largest telecommunications company with more than 27 million mobile subscribers; it invested $1.4 million in DAI.

DAI’s 3D camera technology is based on “dual-aperture sensors,” and a proprietary depth estimation algorithm. Rather than a standard Bayer patter, it uses RGB-IR, or infrared, filters atop the sensor to capture depth information.

SKT will develop applications and additional use cases for DA’s 3D image capture, such as virtual reality and image enhancement technologies.

There’s more information here.

360 degrees: YouTube enables playback of Ricoh’s round video

theta round video

theta round video

The world’s primary video service is now showing 360-degree spherical videos, such as those captured by Ricoh’s latest Theta camera.

Ricoh says “YouTube has recommended the Theta as a key device in creating innovative content for their new video platform.”

The Theta records spherical video at HD resolution at 15 frames per second, with clips up to three minutes in length. Users “no longer need multiple cameras to create video that can be panned and tilted during playback,” Ricoh says. “One simple click captures stunning 360-degree spherical video to view on your personal devices or upload to YouTube’s new service.”

YouTube calls 360-degree video “a new way to see and share your world. You could let viewers see the stage and the crowd of your concert, the sky and the ground as you wingsuit glide, or you could even have a choose-your-own-adventure video where people see a different story depending on where they look.”

When people watch 360-videos on the YouTube app for Android, “they’ll see all the different angles while the video plays”  by moving the phone or tablet around. (iOS apps are in the works.)

In addition to the Theta, YouTube supports video from such cameras as Bublcam, Giroptic’s 360cam, IC Real Tech’s Allie, and Kodak’s SP360.

 

Curved sensors claimed to zoom without moving parts

optiz2

optiz

A new variable-density sensor design yields “greater sensitivity, lower module profile, superior zooming, and dynamic focusing capabilities,”  claims a Palo Alto start-up  “all without moving parts.”

Optiz says its proprietary “Zoom In” and “Zoom Out” architecture technology uses a combination of unique pixel design, exclusive optical interface structure, and specialized imaging algorithms “to address the lack of zoom function in the mobile imaging platform.”

There’s more information here. (Hat tip to Imaging Resource.)

Top Tech Digest: Fusion, optics, longevity

Impecca The Alert Band - with driver

Impecca The Alert Band - with driver

There’s too much tech news to pay attention to – so this digest highlights the most promising products and interesting innovations.

In this edition:

Lockheed Martin says it will soon sustain fusion
• No tangles: Wireless earbuds use magnetic induction
• Transistor + memory = memristor
• Polymer injection stops fatal bleeding
• Band detects driver fatigue
• 3D-print a custom low-cost mechanical sensor
• Print delicious snacks
• Flexible wearable stickers control your phone
• A brick can cool your house
• Printing plastic cars
• Self-driving cars could cut commutes
• Tires generate electricity from friction
• Laser Destroys Truck
• Apple to “revolutionize medical studies”
• Satellite camera spots skin cancer signs
• 500 years? Google invests in Immortality
• Billion-dollar wristband
• Liquid metal shifts shape, moves, and pumps
• Spherical lenses yield wide-angle 3D display
• Bug-like electronic eye stabilizes flying robot
• Blind can read with finger-camera
• First photo of light as particle and wave
• Qualcomm senses fingerprints
• Silicon bends light for “optical link”
• Sunglasses correct color blindness
• Emerging technologies of 2015

You can read the entire Digest here.

Top Tech Weekly Digest March 12, 2015

Highlighting promising products and interesting innovations

In this edition:

Lockheed Martin says it will soon sustain fusion

No tangles: Wireless earbuds use magnetic induction

Transistor + memory = memristor

Polymer injection stops fatal bleeding

Band detects driver fatigue

3D-print a custom low-cost mechanical sensor

Print delicious snacks

Flexible wearable stickers control your phone

A brick can cool your house

Printing plastic cars

Self-driving cars could cut commutes

Tires generate electricity from friction

Laser Destroys Truck

Apple to “revolutionize medical studies”

Satellite camera spots skin cancer signs

500 years? Google invests in Immortality

Billion-dollar wristband

Liquid metal shifts shape, moves, and pumps

Spherical lenses yield wide-angle 3D display

Bug-like electronic eye stabilizes flying robot

Blind can read with finger-camera

First photo of light as particle and wave

Qualcomm senses fingerprints

Silicon bends light for “optical link”

“A Network of Eyes” — help the blind to see with a phone app

Sunglasses correct color blindness

Emerging technologies of 2015

http://toptentodaytech.blogspot.com/2015/03/top-tech-weekly-digest-fusion-optics.html

Top Tech#6: Holograms, eye implants, bionics, haptics, rockets, teleportation.. and doodling

leia city

leia city

There’s a lot of technology news — but this digest aims to highlight only the most interesting or important innovations.

This edition’s Headlines

Leia’s only hope: Holograms
Lenses as thin as paper
3D-printed wearable temperature sensor
Second Sight implants aid eyes
Brain-bossed Bionic Hand
Gadgets that touch you
Smartphone scans for HIV
Take-off for brain-driven drone
‘Butt Boop’ Boeing Launcher
Beam me up — Quantum teleportation achieved
3Doodler draws solid lines
Intel flies 3D camera

You can read the full article here.

From 1966: first Selfie in space

aldrin selfie

aldrin selfie

Hundreds of photographs from the early years of the space age are for sale, reports the NY Times. They include the first image taken from space, in 1946 — and the first selfie in space, shot by astronaut Buzz Aldrin twenty years later, in 1966.

The vintage prints — not reproductions — are being auctioned by a European collector. Many were “never widely distributed by NASA.”

Here is the full story.